The results of a survey of Scotland's teachers, published by the EIS ahead of its AGM this week, has confirmed that teacher workload remains high in schools across the country.

A wide range of concerns were expressed by teachers in the survey, including: increases in workload; the negative impact of workload on wellbeing; lack of time available for professional development; major curricular change; long working hours. Perhaps most significantly, 58% of respondents indicated that they would not recommend teaching as a career – an increase compared to survey results from last year.

EIS General Secretary Larry Flanagan said, "As we move into the EIS Annual General Meeting, which starts tomorrow, the results of this survey make for worrying reading. Despite statements from the Scottish Government, local authorities and national education bodies that promised action to tackle excessive levels of teacher workload, the results of our survey indicate that little has improved and some difficulties actually seems to have grown worse."

"The EIS is currently in the midst of a major pay campaign urging the Scottish Government and local authorities to value education and value teachers. We have frequently been told that meaningful pay rises are unaffordable, but that extra teachers are being employed and that workload is being tackled."

"These survey results confirm that teachers are seeing little improvement, and that severe pressure continues to be piled onto our overworked, undervalued and underpaid teachers. This clearly highlights the need for increased investment in education and in the pay of Scotland’s teachers."

Some of the key results from the survey include:

  • Over 34 % of respondents stated that workload had increased significantly over the 2017-2018 session. In the 2017, survey 32 % of respondents stated that workload had increased significantly during that year
  • Overall, 85% of respondents indicated that workload had either increased or increased significantly during the past year
  • The average level of satisfaction with workload levels has experienced minimal change since last year. On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being least satisfied) the average level was 4 in both 2017 and 2018
  • 90% of respondents stated that they do not have sufficient time to dedicate to professional learning. This has increased since last year (85%)
  • The average level of wellbeing at work has also experienced minimal change since last year. On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being “I do not feel well within my job”) the average level was 5 in both 2017 and 2018
  • The level of respondents who would not recommend teaching as a profession has increased. A majority of 58% of respondents stated that they would not recommend teaching as a profession. The 2017 figure was 54%
  • Workload, changes to the curriculum and working hours are still the main cause of job dissatisfaction
  • Achievements with students, interaction with students and interaction with colleagues still create the most job satisfaction.